Further emphasizing the damaging and widespread effects of Levaquin, Illinois resident John Sprehe has sued the makers and a distributor of the drug, alleging that the medicine directly caused him damage and suffering in the form of tendon injuries.

Sprehe argues that the potential side effects of Levaquin use were not made clear when he began taking the medicine. He attributes his permanent and debilitating tendon injuries to taking the medication, citing its long-standing association with degradation of joint tissues.

The suit names the usual slate of defendants as seem to regularly come up in these cases. First, the suit names the manufacturers and developers of Levaquin, Johnson & Johnson, Ortho-McNeil Pharmaceutical and Johnson & Johnson Pharmaceutical Research and Development. On the distribution end, Sprehe has named Walgreens as a defendant, as well.

Sprehe’s case argues that when Levaquin was first introduced, the warnings of side effects relating to tendon degradation were deeply buried in long lists of potential side effects. Furthermore, he claims that these warnings did nothing to stress that the risks were nearly tripled for patients over the age of 60, arguably one of the most common groups prescribed the medication. Going even further, he alleges that even though the companies did adhere eventually to black-box warning demands put in place by the FDA, these warnings don’t elaborate on the fact that Levaquin is more toxic to tendons than similar medications.

The 10-count suit specifically alleges strict liability, negligence, breach of implied warranties, breach of express warranty, common law fraud, violation of the Illinois Consumer Fraud Act, unjust enrichment, breach of warranty and failure to warn. The plaintiff is seeking actual and compensatory damages, plus costs, pre- and post-judgment interest and other relief the court deems just. There is currently no word as to if or when the case will proceed to trial or settlement hearings.

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